Home » Astrology » Belief in astrology should not be confused with worship of the gods

Belief in astrology should not be confused with worship of the gods

There was a time when the gods meant everything and guided us, but that time is long past

I am ruminating today upon these lyrics of a song by Alan Parsons, called “The Eagle Will Rise Again,” from the Pyramid album:

The Eagle Will Rise Again

And I could easily fall from grace,
Then another would take my place
For the chance to behold your face…

And the days of my life are but grains of sand
As they fall from your open hand
At the call of the wind’s command…

Many words are spoken when there’s nothing to say.
They fall upon the ears of those who don’t know the way
To read between the lines, that lead between the lines
That lead me to you.

All that I ask you
Is, show me how to follow you and I’ll obey.
Teach me how to reach you, I can’t find my own way.
Let me see the light…Let me be the light.

As the sun turns slowly around the sky
Till the shadow of night is high…
The eagle will learn to fly.

And the days of his life are but grains of sand
As they fall from your open hand
And vanish among the land.

Many words are spoken when there’s nothing to say…
They fall upon the ears of those who don’t know the way
To read between the lines, by following the signs
That can lead to you…

But show me how to follow you and I’ll obey.
Teach me how to reach you, I can’t find my own way.
Let me see the light…Let me be the light.

And so, with no warning, nor last goodbyes,
In the dawn of the morning skies,
The eagle will rise
Again.

There was a time when it was expected that one would worship at the shrine of a beloved, or feared, god. These lyrics are quite moving, I think, and point to a need in the human psyche to look outside of one’s self for answers, for something to believe in, for someone to look up to and revere.

It used to be that humanity relied on the gods for that need. Now we seem to look to otherwise flawed human beings (rock stars, sports figures, Oprah) but we are always missing the connection with the divine that once was the cornerstone of faith.

This is where the caveat about astrology must come in. Astrology, and especially astrologers, cannot be seen to provide this kind of divine wisdom. To seek the light from a guru, or a person of faith, is, I think, a noble endeavor, and I understand why people want this.

It feels right, at times, to listen to the voice of someone who serves to point you on the path. However, astrologers have always been flawed human beings, as I have pointed out here.

Arguably, the time of being able to get down on one’s knees and worship someone or something is probably passing for most secularised societies. Access to the divine, to something you can follow, however, seems to me to be a strong need that will not die.

The question is, what are we, as a society, replacing gods, goddesses, and shrines with? If it’s astrology, then be mindful. Astrology is not a religion, nor is there a divine source within astrology to follow in times of confusion or trouble. It might seem like there is, or ought to be, but astrologers are only human, and make many mistakes.

Traditionally, God, or a god,  is only knowable through a numinous process of attaining enlightenment after many years of devoted self-sacrifice. Followers of astrology, however, who focus on seeking some form of enlightenment by studying this method are doomed to disillusionment.

Astrology, and astrologers, have practical limits on what they, or we, are capable of. As part of an organised spiritual system, it is possible that astrology can help you understand yourself and the workings of the universe better, but, in my opinion, you really do need to think critically about what you’re hearing before credulously believing in the message.

Because we live in a secular age, it has become almost impossible to truly worship and have faith, but, as these lyrics suggest, that loss is a profound one, leading to a crisis of faith, or the expression of a longing for connection with the elusive divine.

When we, as a species, were able to believe in something greater than ourselves, I suspect a part of our psyches was soothed. Something in us needs someone or something to believe in. This is at least partially the role the gods once had for us. Will we ever go back to that ability to believe in someone or something outside ourselves wholeheartedly? It seems highly unlikely nowadays.

We’re too cynical and skeptical to ever be true believers again, don’t you think? This is why I like reading St. Augustine. He was a skeptic first, and a true believer only after he went through a life of sin, error, and pain.

He found his faith and belief after every other path failed him. Since astrology has no centralised spiritual core, however, I am not terribly worried that there are errant potential St. Augustines out there, seeking answers through astrology in the way St. Augustine found succor through his faith.

It is my opinion that astrology is never going to provide the kind of succor that a real faith or religion can. If you are ever in any doubt about the differences between astrology and religion, read St. Augustine, and you will see what I mean.

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